Burgerlib is a cross platform low level library that handles most common tasks and data management in an abstract way. Think of it as an operating system that buffers your application so that it has no idea what machine it's really running on. It has been used in over 30 shipping computer video games and applications. The library is the result of over nine years of hard labor and engineering.

Burgerlib can be built from MacOS and Win32 hosts. The library targets MacOS (68k), MacOS Classic, MacOS Carbon, MacOSX, Win32, MSDos with the Dos4gw dos extender, MSDos with the FlashTek X32 Dos extender, XBox, Playstation 2, GameCube, Gameboy Advance. Other platforms are planned in the near future depending on demand and whether I can get my hands on development kits.

For the MacOS hosts, you can build the MacOS and Win32 targets. The Win32 host can target everything but the Mac.

To read the online documentation, just go to the official Burgerlib documentation page.

Only the MacOS, MSDos and Win32 targets will generally be available to the public. Console platform targets can only be given out once proof of a valid license is sent to me to show that you can receive and use code for those systems. Since I am a licensed developer for most console platforms, I must insist upon proper credentials before a distribution of a licensed target can be made.

HostTargetCompiler
Win32Win32 (98, Me, 2000, XP, Vista) Open Watcom 1.8
Win32Win32 (98, Me, 2000, XP, Vista) Intel C++ 10.0
Win32Win32 (98, Me, 2000, XP, Vista) Visual C 7.1 (.NET 2003), 8.0 and 9.0
Win32, MacOSXWin32 (98, Me, 2000, XP, Vista) CodeWarrior 9.4
MacOSApple MacOS 68k CodeWarrior 7.1
MacOSApple MacOS Classic 8.6/9.2 CodeWarrior 10.0
MacOSApple MacOS Carbon 8.6/9.2 CodeWarrior 10.0
MacOSXApple MacOSX 10.3 CodeWarrior 10.0
MacOSXApple MacOSX 10.3 XCode 3.1
Win32Nintendo Gamecube CodeWarrior 2.6
Win32Nintendo Wii CodeWarrior 3.0
Win32Microsoft Xbox Visual C 7.1 (.NET 2003)
Win32Microsoft Xbox 360 Visual C 8.0 (.NET 2005)
Win32Sony Playstation 2 CodeWarrior 3.6
Win32Sony Playstation 2 SN Systems ProDG 3.1 (Coming soon)
Win32Sony Playstation 2 PS2Dev May 2004 (Coming soon)
Win32Nintendo Gameboy Advance CodeWarrior 1.5
Win32Nintendo DS CodeWarrior 2.1
Win32Apple iPhone XCode 3.1
Win32MSDos FlashTek X32 Open Watcom 1.7a
Win32MSDos Dos 4gw Open Watcom 1.7a

SDKs to compile the Burger way!

Each of these archives will decompress to a folder of the same name and must be placed in your "SDKs" folder. Codewarrior needs a "Source Trees" of "SDKs" set to the folder that contains each and every SDK you've installed. You can find the "Source Trees" preference panel from the menu item Edit:Preferences.


Win32 specific SDKs


MacOS specific SDKs


Escape Velocity Nova for Windows Utilities.

  • Updated May 16th, 2004: EVNovaMacToPCPlugIn.sitx (Mac) or EVNovaMacToPCPlugIn.zip (PC). This Win32 and MacOS application will take an Escape Velocity Nova "Plugin" file in ".bin" format and convert it for use with Escape Velocity Nova for Windows. All you have to do is drag and drop the MacOS plug-in onto the application and away you go. If you are using the MacOS version of the application, it will also directly read a MacOS plug-in and output a PC compatible data file. Binary, source and CodeWarrior 9.2 project are included in either the .sitx or the .zip file. I've also included a Visual Studio 2003 .NET project that will build the application if you don't have CodeWarrior 9.2 on your PC. If you make any upgrades to the source, please email me a copy of the changes so I can roll it in the next release. Requires "Burgerlib" for Win32 or MacOS to compile.


MacOS specific Tools and utilities.

  • Updated June 7th, 2004: OS9Cleanup. This 68k init proc (With source and CodeWarrior 8.3 project) is a MacOS 7 through 9.x startup program that will delete a folder or single file as part of an "undelete" or "update" event. Sometimes a shared library can't be removed until you reboot. That's where this comes in. By setting STR resource #128 to the folder or file in question and #129 to the name of this init proc, you can finish your uninstall after the user reboots. This init is written in 680x0 for compactness. It does NOT run in MacOSX. It was never designed to. I used this when I needed to automatically remove an application's shared libraries in MacOS 9.
  • Updated May 3rd, 2004: Power PC Required. This .rsrc file (With source and CodeWarrior 8.3 project) is a mini-68k application that will alert a user of an ancient 680x0 Macintosh that the PowerPC application that's being run requires a PowerPC. The old machines displayed a cryptic error when confronted with a PowerPC application, confusing the user. It's tiny and helps alert the user that his/her machine is sorely needing to be replaced. Well, not really because all it says is "A PowerPC Processor is required to run this application." But you get the drift.